Wednesday, 10 July 2019

Oracle Autonomous Database Cloud

What is Oracle Autonomous Database?

Oracle Autonomous Database allows you rapidly & easily create mission critical databases, It protects data from both external and internal threats, automates all infrastructure & database maintenance, recovers from any failure without downtime and scales online for highest performance & lower cost.



Components of Oracle Autonomous Database:

An Oracle Autonomous database comprises of 3 components:

  • Oracle Exadata
  • Oracle database
  • Automated Data Center Operations and Machine Learning

 

How Does Oracle Database Works:

An Oracle Autonomous Database is self driving, self securing and self repairing.

  • Self Driving: It Automates all databases and infrastructure management, Patching, tune Queries and Monitoring
  • Self Securing: Protects database from both external and malicious internal users by automatically encrypting data both at rest and in transit
  • Self Repairing: Automatically recover from any failure. Protects from all downtime including planned maintenance


Machine Learning:

Automation  built up on the revolutionary machine learning platform enables the Customers with greater database autonomy and capabilities.

  • Workload Optimization: Automatically adapts to the changing workload and optimization of query execution. So Customers doesn't have to tune queries manually.
  • Monitoring & Diagnostics: Detects anomalies and fixes issues ensuring optimal performance and availability. So Customers doesn't have to install or waiting for monitoring and alerting notification.
  • Security: Protects database from both external attacks and malicious internal users by automatically encrypting data and apply security updates.

 

Oracle Autonomous Database Family:
  • Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse (ADW): It is optimized for Data Warehouse, Data Mart & Data lake. Easy provision, connect, load data and execute queries.
  • Oracle Autonomous Transaction Processing (ATP): It is optimized for Transaction processing, batch, Report, Mixed workload, IoT & Application Development. Easy provision, connect, load data and execute queries.

 

Benefits of Autonomous Database:
  • Fast Provisioning: Create the database in minutes, load data & execute queries
  • Autonomous: Automatically tune queries without DBA intervention
  • Extreme Performance: Run Oracle workload up to 13x faster on Oracle Exadata


Steps to create an Autonomous Database:

It just takes 4 steps to create an Autonomous Database (DW, Data mart or OLTP) and in few minutes the customers can have Autonomous database ready to connect and load data and start using it. 




Migrating to Oracle Autonomous Database

  • Oracle Database is same in the cloud as on-premises. You can move it to the cloud without having to change application code.
  • Quickly obtain environments for testing and development. Take on-premises data, move onto the cloud storage for fast analysis, backup or archiving.
  • Get an enterprise production ready database in minutes for fast migration to cloud. Tuning, patching, backup, disaster recovery, high availability for them automatically.


Oracle Autonomous database Security Capabilities:

  • Autonomous database automatically applies patches and upgrades eliminating human error, keeping the system protected.
  • Oracle Database Vault protects the database from internal administrator access, allows administrators to perform their job, but not access the data itself.
  • By default, Oracle Autonomous database uses TDE to protect data at rest. It also protects data in transit when the client uses SSL/TLS 1.2.


Oracle Autonomous Database Deployment option:

  • Autonomous Database Serverless: Simple & Elastic. Oracle automates and manages everything. You just choose the compute , storage and region. Start with minimum 1 OCPU & 1 hour minimum commitment time and Instantly grow or shrink online.
  • Autonomous Database Dedicated: Provides a Private database cloud running on a dedicated Exadata cloud infrastructure in the Public cloud. Highly isolated and Customizable operation policies. Available as Cloud at Customer solution.


Which Autonomous Database Deployment is best for me?

Regardless of which Autonomous Database deployment you chose you will get the same great features, functionality, security and performance you have grown to expect from the Oracle Database.

For users that are simply looking for a database for a specific application or project and don't want to be involved in choosing any database details like versions, patching, etc., Serverless is right choice. Whereas users that want to rethink their IT strategy and care about things like patching schedules, software versions, workload isolation, and want to be involved in choosing these, then Dedicated is the right choice.


Conclusion:

In this article we have learned about Oracle Autonomous database cloud, its components, benefits and capabilities and different Autonomous database deployment options available.



Tuesday, 25 June 2019

Step By Step Exadata Storage Cell Rescue Process


You will be ended up performing storage cell rescue under the following situations:
  • Improper Battery Replacement
  • Improper Card Seating
  • Card Damage During Battery Replacement
  • Corrupted Root File System

In this article we will demonstrate step by step process to Rescue an Exadata Storage Cell or server.

Open a browser and enter the ILOM hostname or IP address of the Storage cell you want to rescue
https://dm01cel02-ilom.netsoftmate.com

Enter root crendentials

On the left pane under "Remote Control", click "Redirection". Select "Use video redirection" and click "Launch Remote Console" button

Click OK

 Click OK

Click Continue

Click Run

Click Continue (not recommended)

From the ILOM video console we can see that the root file system can't be mounted due to corruption and it will be rebooted again in 60 seconds

On the left pane under "Host Management" click on "Power Control". From the drop down list Select "Power Cycle"

Click Save

Click OK

Rebooting in progress

Server is no rebooting


Immediately press Ctrl+S on keyboard 

Select the "CELL_USB_BOOT_CELLBOOT_usb_in_rescue_mode

At the point, we will have continue the rescue process using serial ILOM

As root, ssh to the storage cell ILOM and start the serial console

Enter r and hit return

Enter y and hit return

Enter the rescue password sos1exadata. Enter n and hit return

Enter the root user password 

We are into the rescue mode. At this moment check to make sure that the there are no file system issue. Fix any other issue you may have. Consult Oracle if required

Reboot the server again to complete the rescue process

Hit return

The server is powered off

Power on the server using web ILOM as shown below

Rescue process is completed and we got the root login prompt


Login to the server as root user and perform the post rescue steps
  
Verify the image version of the storage cell


Post Storage Cell Rescue steps:

[root@dm01cel02 ~]# imageinfo

Kernel version: 4.1.12-94.8.4.el6uek.x86_64 #2 SMP Sat May 5 16:14:51 PDT 2018 x86_64
Cell version: OSS_18.1.7.0.0AUG_LINUX.X64_180821
Cell rpm version: cell-18.1.7.0.0_LINUX.X64_180821-1.x86_64

Active image version: 18.1.7.0.0.180821
Active image kernel version: 4.1.12-94.8.4.el6uek
Active image activated: 2019-03-17 03:27:41 -0500
Active image status: success
Active system partition on device: /dev/md5
Active software partition on device: /dev/md7

Cell boot usb partition: /dev/sdm1
Cell boot usb version: 18.1.7.0.0.180821

Inactive image version: undefined
Rollback to the inactive partitions: Impossible


CellCLI> import celldisk all force
No cell disks qualified for this import operation

CellCLI> list physicaldisk
         12:0            PST0XV          normal
         12:1            PZNDSV          normal
         12:2            PT5Z4V          normal
         12:3            PU3XLV          normal
         12:4            PYAKLV          normal
         12:5            PV828V          normal
         12:6            PZE5NV          normal
         12:7            PYV0YV          normal
         12:8            PZKUXV          normal
         12:9            PYD86V          normal
         12:10           PZL15V          normal
         12:11           PZPLAV          normal
         FLASH_1_1       S2T7NCAHA00958  normal
         FLASH_2_1       S2T7NCAHA00986  normal
         FLASH_4_1       S2T7NCAHA00956  normal
         FLASH_5_1       S2T7NCAHA00947  normal

CellCLI> list celldisk
         CD_00_dm01cel02        normal
         CD_01_dm01cel02        normal
         CD_02_dm01cel02        normal
         CD_03_dm01cel02        normal
         CD_04_dm01cel02        normal
         CD_05_dm01cel02        normal
         CD_06_dm01cel02        normal
         CD_07_dm01cel02        normal
         CD_08_dm01cel02        normal
         CD_09_dm01cel02        normal
         CD_10_dm01cel02        normal
         CD_11_dm01cel02        normal
         FD_00_dm01cel02        normal
         FD_01_dm01cel02        normal
         FD_02_dm01cel02        normal
         FD_03_dm01cel02        normal

CellCLI> list griddisk
         DATA_DM01_CD_00_dm01cel02     active
         DATA_DM01_CD_01_dm01cel02     active
         DATA_DM01_CD_02_dm01cel02     active
         DATA_DM01_CD_03_dm01cel02     active
         DATA_DM01_CD_04_dm01cel02     active
         DATA_DM01_CD_05_dm01cel02     active
         DATA_DM01_CD_06_dm01cel02     active
         DATA_DM01_CD_07_dm01cel02     active
         DATA_DM01_CD_08_dm01cel02     active
         DATA_DM01_CD_09_dm01cel02     active
         DATA_DM01_CD_10_dm01cel02     active
         DATA_DM01_CD_11_dm01cel02     active
         DBFS_DG_CD_02_dm01cel02       active
         DBFS_DG_CD_03_dm01cel02       active
         DBFS_DG_CD_04_dm01cel02       active
         DBFS_DG_CD_05_dm01cel02       active
         DBFS_DG_CD_06_dm01cel02       active
         DBFS_DG_CD_07_dm01cel02       active
         DBFS_DG_CD_08_dm01cel02       active
         DBFS_DG_CD_09_dm01cel02       active
         DBFS_DG_CD_10_dm01cel02       active
         DBFS_DG_CD_11_dm01cel02       active
         RECO_DM01_CD_00_dm01cel02     active
         RECO_DM01_CD_01_dm01cel02     active
         RECO_DM01_CD_02_dm01cel02     active
         RECO_DM01_CD_03_dm01cel02     active
         RECO_DM01_CD_04_dm01cel02     active
         RECO_DM01_CD_05_dm01cel02     active
         RECO_DM01_CD_06_dm01cel02     active
         RECO_DM01_CD_07_dm01cel02     active
         RECO_DM01_CD_08_dm01cel02     active
         RECO_DM01_CD_09_dm01cel02     active
         RECO_DM01_CD_10_dm01cel02     active
         RECO_DM01_CD_11_dm01cel02     active


[root@dm01cel02 ~]# cellcli -e list flashcache detail
         name:                   dm01cel02_FLASHCACHE
         cellDisk:               FD_03_dm01cel02,FD_01_dm01cel02,FD_02_dm01cel02,FD_00_dm01cel02
         creationTime:           2019-03-17T03:19:43-05:00
         degradedCelldisks:
         effectiveCacheSize:     11.64312744140625T
         id:                     574c3bd1-7a35-42ba-a03b-75f3a93edac7
         size:                   11.64312744140625T
         status:                 normal

[root@dm01cel02 ~]# cellcli -e list flashlog detail
         name:                   dm01cel02_FLASHLOG
         cellDisk:               FD_03_dm01cel02,FD_00_dm01cel02,FD_01_dm01cel02,FD_02_dm01cel02
         creationTime:           2019-03-17T03:19:43-05:00
         degradedCelldisks:
         effectiveSize:          512M
         efficiency:             100.0
         id:                     73cd8288-c6d8-42c3-95a1-97ce287cf7d0
         size:                   512M
         status:                 normal

SQL> select a.name,b.path,b.state,b.mode_status,b.failgroup
    from v$asm_diskgroup a, v$asm_disk b
    where a.group_number=b.group_number
    and b.failgroup='dm01cel02'
    order by 2,1;

no rows selected


SQL> alter diskgroup DBFS_DG add disk 'o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DBFS_DG_*_dm01cel02' force;

Diskgroup altered.

 
SQL> alter diskgroup DATA_DM01 add disk 'o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DATA_DM01_*_dm01cel02' force;

Diskgroup altered.

 
SQL> alter diskgroup RECO_DM01 add disk 'o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/RECO_DM01_*_dm01cel02' force;

Diskgroup altered.

 
SQL> select * from v$asm_operation;

GROUP_NUMBER OPERA STAT      POWER     ACTUAL      SOFAR   EST_WORK   EST_RATE EST_MINUTES ERROR_CODE
------------ ----- ---- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------- --------------------------------------------
           1 REBAL RUN           4          4     204367    3521267      13041         254
           3 REBAL WAIT          4


 
SQL> select * from v$asm_operation;

no rows selected


SQL> col path for a70
SQL> set lines 200
SQL> set pages 200
SQL> select a.name,b.path,b.state,b.mode_status,b.failgroup
    from v$asm_diskgroup a, v$asm_disk b
    where a.group_number=b.group_number
    and b.failgroup='dm01cel02'
    order by 2,1;  2    3    4    5

NAME                           PATH                                                                   STATE    MODE_ST FAILGROUP
------------------------------ ---------------------------------------------------------------------- -------- ------- ------------------------------
DATA_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DATA_DM01_CD_00_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DATA_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DATA_DM01_CD_01_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DATA_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DATA_DM01_CD_02_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DATA_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DATA_DM01_CD_03_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DATA_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DATA_DM01_CD_04_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DATA_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DATA_DM01_CD_05_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DATA_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DATA_DM01_CD_06_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DATA_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DATA_DM01_CD_07_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DATA_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DATA_DM01_CD_08_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DATA_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DATA_DM01_CD_09_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DATA_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DATA_DM01_CD_10_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DATA_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DATA_DM01_CD_11_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DBFS_DG                        o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DBFS_DG_CD_02_dm01cel02                 NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DBFS_DG                        o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DBFS_DG_CD_03_dm01cel02                 NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DBFS_DG                        o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DBFS_DG_CD_04_dm01cel02                 NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DBFS_DG                        o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DBFS_DG_CD_05_dm01cel02                 NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DBFS_DG                        o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DBFS_DG_CD_06_dm01cel02                 NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DBFS_DG                        o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DBFS_DG_CD_07_dm01cel02                 NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DBFS_DG                        o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DBFS_DG_CD_08_dm01cel02                 NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DBFS_DG                        o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DBFS_DG_CD_09_dm01cel02                 NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DBFS_DG                        o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DBFS_DG_CD_10_dm01cel02                 NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
DBFS_DG                        o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/DBFS_DG_CD_11_dm01cel02                 NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
RECO_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/RECO_DM01_CD_00_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
RECO_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/RECO_DM01_CD_01_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
RECO_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/RECO_DM01_CD_02_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
RECO_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/RECO_DM01_CD_03_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
RECO_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/RECO_DM01_CD_04_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
RECO_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/RECO_DM01_CD_05_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
RECO_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/RECO_DM01_CD_06_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
RECO_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/RECO_DM01_CD_07_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
RECO_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/RECO_DM01_CD_08_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
RECO_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/RECO_DM01_CD_09_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
RECO_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/RECO_DM01_CD_10_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02
RECO_DM01                     o/192.168.1.1;192.168.1.2/RECO_DM01_CD_11_dm01cel02              NORMAL   ONLINE  dm01cel02

34 rows selected.

 

Conclusion

In this article we have demonstrated step by step procedure to perform Storage Cell Rescue. You may have to perform the Storage cell rescue for multiple reasons such as root file system corrupted, Kernel panic, server rebooting continuously and so on. With the help of CELLBOOT usb one can perform the storage cell rescue very easily.

Monday, 17 June 2019

Oracle Database Appliance (ODA) oakcli Vs. odacli


ODA is basically a 2-node RAC cluster database system running Oracle Linux operating (OEL), Oracle Database Enterprise Edition or Standard Edition, Oracle Grid Infrastructure (Clusterware and ASM). All these together provides the Oracle Database high availability running on ODA.

In 2016, Oracle added 3 new models to expand Oracle Database Appliance portfolio. These 3 new models are:
  • Oracle Database Appliance X6-2S (single-instance database)
  • Oracle Database Appliance X6-2M (single-instance database)
  • Oracle Database Appliance X6-2L (single-instance database)

The High Available ODA X6-2 is now known as X6-2 HA which consists of 2 nodes and a storage shelf and optionally an additional storage shelf.

In October 2017, Oracle announced Oracle Database Appliance X7-2 (Small, Medium and HA). ODA X7-2 comes with more computing resources compared with X6-2 Models.
  • Oracle Database Appliance X7-2S (single-instance database)
  • Oracle Database Appliance X7-2M (single-instance database)
  • Oracle Database Appliance X7-2 HA
With ODA X7-2, the ODA Large configuration is discontinued.


With the different model families there is always a confusion that which command line tool to be used for managing, monitoring and administrating Oracle Database Appliance.



In this article we will explain different command line tools that can be used to manage and administer an Oracle Database Appliance Small, Medium, Large and HA models for both Bare Metal and Virtualized Platform environment.


Let’s look at the different command line tools available:

OAKCLI: oakcli stands for Oracle Appliance Kit Command Line Interface. oakcli utility is used to manage Oracle Database Appliance. It used to carry out management tasks such as, Deploying, Patching, validating, monitoring, troubleshooting, Create Database, create database homes, configuring core key, manage Virtual machines and so on.

ODACLI: It is used for Hardware and administrative tasks on the Oracle Database Appliance, Example: Hardware monitoring and Storage Configuration

ODAADMICLI: It is used for everyday task on the Oracle Database Appliance, Example: Database Creation, Patches and upgrades, Job creation and manage and so on
The following table provides a quick reference on when to use oakcli Vs. odacli/odaadmcli

  • For Oracle Database Appliance software version 12.2.1.4 or older use the tools as shown in the following table
Oakcli
odacli/odaadmcli
ODA V1
ODA X6-2 S, M, L
ODA X3-2
ODA X7-2 S, M
ODA X4-2
ODA X7-2 HA (Bare Metal only) 
ODA X5-2

ODA X6-2 HA

ODA X7-2 HA (VM Only)

 
  • For Oracle Database Appliance software version 18.3.0.0 and later user the tools as shown in the following table
oakcli
odacli/odaadmcli
All hardware versions running Virtualized platform
All hardware versions running Bare Metal (physical)


Examples using oakcli, odacli and odaadmcli:

[root@odanode1 ~]# odacli describe-appliance

Appliance Information
----------------------------------------------------------------
                     ID: 9aef262c-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-0d877c03d762
               Platform: ODA
        Data Disk Count: 2
         CPU Core Count: 10
                Created: May 23, 2017 3:08:03 AM CST

System Information
----------------------------------------------------------------
                   Name: odanode
            Domain Name: netsoftmate.com
              Time Zone: Asia/Pacific
             DB Edition: EE
            DNS Servers: 10.1.1.1
            NTP Servers: ntp1.netsoftmate.com

Disk Group Information
----------------------------------------------------------------
DG Name                   Redundancy                Percentage
------------------------- ------------------------- ------------
Data                      Normal                    80
Reco                      Normal                    20


[root@odanode1 ~]# odaadmcli show disk
        NAME            PATH            TYPE            STATE           STATE_DETAILS

        pd_00           /dev/nvme0n1    NVD             ONLINE          Good
        pd_01           /dev/nvme1n1    NVD             ONLINE          Good


[root@odanode1 ~]# odaadmcli show diskgroup
DiskGroups
----------
DATA
RECO


[root@odanode1 ~]# odaadmcli show env_hw
BM ODA X6-2 Small


[root@odanode1 ~]# odaadmcli show storage
==== BEGIN STORAGE DUMP ========
Host Description: Oracle Corporation:ORACLE SERVER X6-2
Total number of controllers: 2
        Id          = 0
        Pci Slot    = 10
        Serial Num  = xxxxxxxxxx
        Vendor      = Samsung
        Model       = MS1PC2DD3ORA3.2T
        FwVers      = KPYABR3Q
        strId       = nvme:19:00.00
        Pci Address = 19:00.0

        Id          = 1
        Pci Slot    = 11
        Serial Num  = xxxxxxxxxxx
        Vendor      = Samsung
        Model       = MS1PC2DD3ORA3.2T
        FwVers      = KPYABR3Q
        strId       = nvme:1b:00.00
        Pci Address = 1b:00.0

Total number of expanders: 0
Total number of PDs: 2
        /dev/nvme0n1    Samsung           NVD 3200gb slot:  0  pci : 19
        /dev/nvme1n1    Samsung           NVD 3200gb slot:  1  pci : 1b
==== END STORAGE DUMP =========


[root@odanode1 ~]# oakcli show env_hw
BM ODA X5-2
Public interface : COPPER


[root@odanode1 ~]# oakcli show oda_base
ODA base domain
ODA base CPU cores :36
ODA base domain memory :362
ODA base template :/OVS/template.tar.gz
ODA base vlans :['priv1', 'net1']
ODA base current status :Running


[root@odanode1 ~]# oakcli show env_hw
VM-oda_base ODA X7-2 HA



Conclusion
In this article we have learned about Oracle Database Appliance X6-2 and X7-2 model family. Also, we have learned when to use different ODA command lines tools such as oakcli, odacli and odaadmcli to manage and administer an Oracle Database Appliance.




Oracle Autonomous Database Cloud

What is Oracle Autonomous Database? Oracle Autonomous Database allows you rapidly & easily create mission critical databases, It protec...